Bamyan in afghanistan predating european oil painting by some

Therefore he looted Buddhist monasteries and stole other important artifacts.Nader Shah fired cannons at the statues, but it was beyond his capabilities to destroy them.monumental statues of standing buddhas carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamyan valley in the Hazarajat region of central Afghanistan, situated 230 km (143 miles) northwest of Kabul at an altitude of 2500 meters (8,202 ft).Built in 507, the larger in 554 The main bodies were hewn directly from the sandstone cliffs, but details were modeled in mud mixed with straw, coated with stucco.The two most prominent statues were the giant standing Buddhas Vairocana and Sakyamuni, identified by the different mudras performed, measuring 55 and 37 metres (180 and 121 feet) high respectively, the largest examples of standing Buddha carvings in the world. The smaller of the statues was built in 507, the larger in 554.They are believed to have been built by the Kushans, with the guidance of local Buddhist monks, at the heyday of their empire.Because Afghanistan’s Buddhist population no longer exists, which removed the possibility of the statues being worshiped, he added: “The government considers the Bamyan statues as an example of a potential major source of income for Afghanistan from international visitors.

In July 1999, Mullah Mohammed Omar issued a decree in favor of the preservation of the Bamyan Buddha’s statue.The larger statue reappears as the malevolent giant Salsal in medieval Turkish tales.When Mahmud of Ghazni attacked Afghanistan and part of west India in the 11th century, the physical destruction of the Buddhas and frescoes were beyond his capability.The Chinese Buddhist pilgrim Xuanzang passed through the area around 630 and described Bamyan as a flourishing Buddhist center “with more than ten monasteries and more than a thousand monks”.He also noted that both Buddha figures were “decorated with gold and fine jewels” (Wriggins, 1995).

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